Sustainability  >  Recycling  >  Recyling Household Waste

What to do with household waste

This is a partial listing intended to help you determine the best way to get rid of your unwanted hazardous materials, including chemicals, computers and other electronics, prescription drugs, and more.  Special thanks to the members of the Creighton community who informed us of some of these locations.  If you know of another place that accepts these items, please contact us.

Electronics

This is a partial listing intended to help you determine the best way to get rid of your unwanted hazardous materials, including computers and other electronics.  Special thanks to the members of the Creighton community who informed us of some of these locations.  If you know of another place that accepts these items, please contact us.

  • DataShield is located at 1528 N. 16th Street.
  • LifeSpan Technology Recycling is located at 8616 G Street.  There is a charge for disposing of your electronics ($10/monitor, $8/PC, $8/Printer and $1.50 per inch for TVs).  (402)592-2724
  • Best Buy has a recycling program that accepts most electronics free of charge.  In instances where there is a fee, they give you a gift card for the amount of the fee.
  • Keep Omaha Beautiful has a website dedicated to recycling, which contains a list of recycling centers for various types of waste.    

The EPA has listed programs that recycle or reuse electronics.

Dell has a program in which you can recycle your old computer or donate it for reuse within the community.  Please see their website for further details; you do not have to have a Dell computer to utilize these programs.  Apple has a similar program.

 

Goodwill Industries locations in the Omaha area now accept used computers for donation.  Find a drop-off point near you.  Used computers can be purchased at the store near 144th and West Center Road.

 

Sam's Club has a trade-in and recycle program for electronics that is available to its members.  Find out more here.

Recycling in Omaha and Council Bluffs

The City of Council Bluffs has a website detailing their solid waste and recycling program.  The recycling center is located at 4441 Gifford Road.  They accept household hazardous waste and various recyclables, as well as taking electronics for a fee. 


The City of Omaha recycling program lists what can and can not be recycled at curbside.  There is also good information here about reducing the amount of waste you generate and a handy chart listing common items and how to dispose of them.

Fluorescent Bulbs

Fluorescent bulbs should be recycled.  WasteCap Nebraska keeps a list of locations that accept them for recycling.  Under the Sink, Home Depot, and DataShield are among the local options.

The EPA has information on CFLs, including how to clean up a broken bulb, how and why to recycle them, and more.

Household Hazardous Waste

Under the Sink is Omaha's household hazardous waste collection facility, located at 4001 S. 120th Street.  It is open by appointment to anyone living in Douglas or Sarpy counties; the waste is collected free of charge.  A list of what the facility will accept is on the website, or call 444-SINK for more information.  Look for the following signal words on labels to determine if your waste is hazardous: Caution; Warning; Danger; Poison; Flammable; Volatile; Caustic; Corrosive.  This facility DOES NOT accept electronics (including computers).

Surplus Building Materials

The Habitat for Humanity ReStore store accepts (and sells) used and new building materials at its area locations:

  • 1003 South 24th Street, Omaha (402) 934-1033
  • West Maple ReStore, 10930 Emmet Street (108th and Maple)
  • 645 9th Ave, Council Bluffs (712) 328-9476

Prescription Drugs

What is the safest way to dispose of household drugs?

  • At least twice a year, local communities offer drug take-back programs, which are a convenient and safe way to dispose of your drugs.
  • Follow any specific disposal instructions on the drug label or patient information that accompanies the medication. Do not flush prescription drugs down the toilet unless this information specifically instructs you to do so.
  • If no instructions are given on the drug label and no take-back program is available in your area, throw the drugs in the household trash, but first:
    • Take them out of their original containers and mix them with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds or kitty litter. The medication will be less appealing to children and pets, and unrecognizable to people who may intentionally go through your trash.
    • Put them in a sealable bag, empty can, or other container to prevent the medication from leaking or breaking out of a garbage bag.

The FDA has more information available here.