Cartoons

1854 "The Split Crow in Difficulties.--A Fable for the Day." Punch, No. 657. February 11, 1854. 10¾" x 8¼". $9.99 from Ed and Laura Harrison, oldartgallery, N. Olmsted, OH, through Ebay, August, '99.

"A split crow fancying himself an eagle, fixed his talons in the fleece of a sheep--but, neither able to move his prey, nor to disentangle his feet, he was destroyed by the shepherds." Part of the joke here lies in the fact that the crow is split and wears a Kaiser's crown--in fact, two of them! There is an inch tear through the border of the cartoon. Click on the image to see a much larger version.

 

Punch Crow and Ramb2bmini.jpg (27125 bytes) 1934 "The Tortoise and the Hare from the Walt Disney Silly Symphony." Good Housekeeping, Oct., 1934. Page 37, with five cartoon panels detailing the race. 8 1/8" x 11½". $12.50 from Byron Grush, Cerrillos, NM, through Ebay, Sept., '00.

The conception here is just as it is in the early Disney book presentations of TH in 1935. Rhyming verse quatrains here follow the story, with Disney's usual inclusion of Miss Cottontail's Boarding School, interested snails, and a last minute thrust of his head by the tortoise to win. Excellent condition.

 

1950? "aymez votre prochain." Renard clad as a pilgrim (or monk?) seems to be preaching to the roosters and hens up in a tree. Perhaps a reference to La Fontaine 12.18? 40 Francs from Annick Tilly, Clignancourt, July, '01.

After consideration, I think the image has little to do with "Renard and the Turkeys." I suspect that this is not a fable presentation at all. I need help here from the "Roman de Renard" experts! I can tell no more about its source than that it appeared in a French newspaper. Annick or someone else has written "La Fontaine" on this black-and-white image.

 

1978 "A Getting-Away-With-It Fable." Crawdaddy Magazine, p. 30. 1978. Illustration by George Jartos. $9.99 from John Huber, Livonia, MI, through eBay, May, '08.

This grasshopper signs a recording deal and cuts an album of Cajun songs "that the ants really dug and the grasshopper went platinum and moved to L.A. while the ants sat around in holes eating some really disgusting things." Good fun!

 

1980? Laugh Parade by Bill Hoest. "Aesop… Are you telling me another fable?" Unknown source and publication.

An attractive mother dressed in ancient style stands before some obviously Greek buildings and asks a downcast little fellow this question.

 

1983 Big George. TH cartoon. "What do I get if I win?" asks a man at a starting line between tortoise and hare. Signed "Vip" and dated 5-12. Appeared in the Omaha World-Herald of Thursday, May 12, 1983. Copyright 1983 Field Enterprises, Inc.

Does that bunny have a black eye? I am not sure that I get the joke here….

 

1986 Frank and Ernest. TH cartoon. "Those bookies are going to kill me!" exclaims the frantic hare approaching the finish line with the tortoise leading him. Dated 5-13. Copyright 1986 NEA, Inc. Signed "Thaves." Unknown publication and source.

This is one of the funniest fable cartoons I have encountered. People respond to it immediately in lectures in which I have shown it.

 

1988? Cartoon xerox. A tortoise and hare eat a Chinese meal together. The artist's signature seems to be that of Matt Herberg. Unknown publication and source.

Opening his fortune cookie, the hare says "Slow and steady wins the race What's yours say?"

 

1990? Cartoon xerox. A lion plays a guitar while a mouse sits at the base of a nearby tree. W. Steig. Unknown publication and source.

This cartoon represents a very peaceful scene. I have no idea how the cartoon relates to the fable!

 

2003 Mother Goose on the Loose: Illustrated With Cartoons from The New Yorker. Edited by Bobbye S. Goldstein. NY: Harry N. Abrams.

I am not sure that "Old Mother Goose and the Golden Egg" (92) really relates to the fable of "The Goose and the Golden Egg," but each of the three cartoons here certainly does relate to the fable. The artist for this cartoon is Chon Day. Click on the cartoon at the right to see it full size. Click here to view the bibliography entry for the book itself.

 

2003 Mother Goose on the Loose: Illustrated With Cartoons from The New Yorker. Edited by Bobbye S. Goldstein. NY: Harry N. Abrams.

I am not sure that "Old Mother Goose and the Golden Egg" (92) really relates to the fable of "The Goose and the Golden Egg," but each of the three cartoons here certainly does relate to the fable. The artist for this cartoon is Mick Stevens. Click on the cartoon at the right to see it full size. Click here to view the bibliography entry for the book itself.

 

2003 Mother Goose on the Loose: Illustrated With Cartoons from The New Yorker. Edited by Bobbye S. Goldstein. NY: Harry N. Abrams.

I am not sure that "Old Mother Goose and the Golden Egg" (92) really relates to the fable of "The Goose and the Golden Egg," but each of the three cartoons here certainly does relate to the fable. The artist for this cartoon is Henry Martin. Click on the cartoon at the right to see it full size. Click here to view the bibliography entry for the book itself.

 

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