Aesop's Fables > Books of Fables > Series Books > Fox Fables Bilingual by Casey and Iago

Fox Fables Bilingual by Casey and Iago

 

2006 Basne o lisici/Fox Fables (Croatian & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Croatian translation by Dubravka Janekovic.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $7.83 from Better World Books through Amazon, Jan., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have thirteen.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  This used copy is enclosed in a plastic dust-jacket with its own plastic odor.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Mandarin, Croatian, and Somali.

2006 Fox Fables (Arabic and English). Retold by Dawn Casey. Arabic translation by Wafa' Tarnowska. Illustrated by Jago. Paperbound. London: Mantra Lingua Ltd. AU$27.95 from Asia Bookroom, Macquarie ACT, Australia by mail, July, '08.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually. It belongs to a series. The back cover's explanations do not make totally clear whether there is one portion of the series that presents many different fables. It does make clear that a portion of the series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book. I count thirty-three languages listed on the back cover. Good for them! I hope at some flea market some day to get all thirty-three! FS is visually splendid! The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts. Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house." The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music. The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable. Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him. In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest. Tiger roars with laughter. Fox answers that he will show tiger. "This I've got to see," tiger says. Fox gets tiger to walk behind him. Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect. Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest. Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy. This story is also strongly illustrated.

2006 Fox Fables (Farsi & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Farsi translation by Anwar Soltani.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $9.56 from World Books through Ebay, Feb., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have seventeen.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  This used copy is enclosed in a plastic dust-jacket.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Mandarin, Croatian, Farsi, and Somali.

2006 Fox Fables (Japanese & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey; Japanese translation by Maiko Osada.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $14.96 from Book Depository, Jan., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have thirteen.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Turkish, Japanese, and Somali.

2006 Fox Fables/Favole sulla volpe.  Retold by Dawn Casey/Italian translation by Michela Mashi.  Illustrated by Jago. Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $10.20 from World of Books through eBay, Jan., '18.

I am getting a number of these Mantra Lingua bilingual "Fox Fables" paperbacks over time.  This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series.  The back cover's explanations do not make totally clear whether there is one portion of the series that presents many different fables.  It does make clear that a portion of the series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  I count thirty-three languages listed on the back cover.  Good for them!  I hope at some flea market someday to get all thirty-three!  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  The cover of this copy is bent and peeling.

2006 Fox Fables (Bengali and English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Bengali translation by Kanai Datta.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $18.40 from Better World Books, Jan., '14.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have six.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FS is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  This copy belonged to the Houston Public Library.

2006 Fox Fables (Urdu and English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Urdu Translation by Qamar Zamani.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  £2.49 from Awesome Books, Wallingford, UK, April, '12.

This is the second version I have found of this large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually. Whereas the copy I found four years ago was Arabic and English, this copy is Urdu and English. I hope at some flea market some day to get all thirty-three bilingual translations! FS is visually splendid! The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts. Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house." The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music. The second story here is "The Ruler of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable. It was called "King of the Forest" in my earlier version. Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him. In desperation, fox claims that he is ruler of the forest. Tiger roars with laughter. Fox answers that he will show tiger. "This I've got to see," tiger says. Fox gets tiger to walk behind him. Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect. Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the ruler of the forest. Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy. This story is also strongly illustrated. I fear this copy is lacking its very first inside page. I am thus unsure of the Urdu translator of the first fable.

2006 Fox Fables (Swahili and English). Retold by Dawn Casey. Illustrated by Jago. Paperbound. London: Mantra Lingua Ltd. £7.99 from Awesome Books, Wallingford, UK, June, '12.

This is the third version I have found of this large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually. Earlier copies have combined English with Arabic and English with Urdu. Here English is combined with Swahili. The Swahili translator is not acknoweldged for either story. I hope at some flea market some day to get all thirty-three bilingual translations! FS is visually splendid! The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts. Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house." The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music. The second story here is "The King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable. Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him. In desperation, fox claims that he is ruler of the forest. Tiger roars with laughter. Fox answers that he will show tiger. "This I've got to see," tiger says. Fox gets tiger to walk behind him. Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect. Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the ruler of the forest. Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy. This story is also strongly illustrated. 

2006 Fox Fables/Mga Alamat Soro (Tagalog & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Tagalog translation by Ana Taguba.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $3.99 from Better World Books through Ebay, March, '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have eighteen.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  This particular copy was formerly in the Helen Plum Library in Lombard, IL.  It has covers stiffened by plastic overlays skillfully applied.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Mandarin, Croatian, Farsi, Japanese, Somali, Turkish, Hindi, Tagalog, and Somali.

2006 Les Fables du Renard/Fox Fables.  Retold by Dawn Casey.  French translation by Annie Arnold.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $15 from Better World Books, July, '12.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have five, including Arabic, Urdu, Swahili, and Polish.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FS is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.

2006 Lisie bajki/Fox Fables. Retold by Dawn Casey/Polish translation by Jolanta Starek-Corile. Illustrated by Jago. Paperbound. London: Mantra Lingua Ltd. $14.94 from Better World Books, July, '12.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually. It belongs to a series, of which I now have four. The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book. FS is visually splendid! The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts. Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house." The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music. The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable. Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him. In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest. Tiger roars with laughter. Fox answers that he will show tiger. "This I've got to see," tiger says. Fox gets tiger to walk behind him. Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect. Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest. Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy. This story is also strongly illustrated. This copy apparently belonged to Salford Public Library in greater Manchester, England. 

2006 Sheekadii Dawaca/Fox Fables (Somali & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey.  Somali translation by Adam Jama.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $4.65 from Better World Books, Jan., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have eleven.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, and Somali.

2006 Tilki Masallari/Fox Fables (Turkish & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Turkish translation by Talin Altun Suzme.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $3.97 from Better World Books, Jan., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have twelve.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Turkish, and Somali.

2006/12 Fox Fables.  Retold by Dawn Casey/Arabic translation by Wafa' Tarnowska.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $18.40 from Better World Books, Jan., '14.

Here is a second good copy of this paperbound book, this one a 2012 edition..  The only changes from the 2006 edition are the date of the edition on the last page and several changes on the back cover.  There the first three paragraphs have the same text but are differently formatted.  It seems that several languages have been dropped, including Albanian and Croatian.  Mandarin seems to have been added.  Has the ISBN's last digit changed from a 7 to a 6?  I wrote the following then:  This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series.  The back cover's explanations do not make totally clear whether there is one portion of the series that presents many different fables.  It does make clear that a portion of the series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.

2006/12 Fox Fables (Hindi & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Hindi translation by Awadhesh Misra.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $7.35 from World Books through Ebay, Feb., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have seventeen.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Mandarin, Croatian, Farsi, Japanese, Somali, Turkish, Hindi, and Somali.

2006/12 The Fox and the Crane/Pis I Zheuravry [Cover: Fox Fables/Basni o Pise].  Retold by Dawn Casey/Russian translation by Lydia Buravova.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $18.37 from Moby  the Great through eBay, July, '18.

I am getting a number of these Mantra Lingua bilingual "Fox Fables" paperbacks over time.  This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series.  The back cover's explanations do not make totally clear whether there is one portion of the series that presents many different fables.  It does make clear that a portion of the series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  I count thirty-three languages listed on the back cover.  Good for them!  I hope at some flea market someday to get all thirty-three!  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.

2006/13 The Fox and the Crane [Cover: Fox Fables].  Retold by Dawn Casey/Tamil translation by Siva Pillai.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $18.40 from Moby the Great through eBay, June, '18.

I am getting a number of these Mantra Lingua bilingual "Fox Fables" paperbacks over time.  This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series.  The back cover's explanations do not make totally clear whether there is one portion of the series that presents many different fables.  It does make clear that a portion of the series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  I count thirty-three languages listed on the back cover.  Good for them!  I hope at some flea market someday to get all thirty-three!  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.

2006/19 Fox Fables (Mandarin & English).  Retold by Dawn Casey/Mandarin translation by Sylvia Denham.  Illustrated by Jago.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $14.81 from Amazon, Jan., '20.

This is a large, handsome, landscape-formatted book of 32 pages presenting two fables bilingually.  It belongs to a series, of which I now have twelve.  The series presents the two fables of this book by pairing English with a number of different languages, one for each book.  FC is visually splendid!  The size of the book allows Jago to create impressive illustrations like that of the crane unable to slurp up soup as well as three detailed specific views of her attempts.  Casey has the crane thank the fox for his kindness politely and add: "Please let me repay you -- come to dinner at my house."  The page after the story lists activities: writing, art, "maths," storytelling, and music.  The second story here is "King of the Forest," and it is labelled a Chinese fable.  Tiger comes upon fox and frightens him.  In desperation, fox claims that he is king of the forest.  Tiger roars with laughter.  Fox answers that he will show tiger.  "This I've got to see," tiger says.  Fox gets tiger to walk behind him.  Of course, every animal upon whom these two come runs away in respect.  Tiger is fooled and pays his respects to the king of the forest.  Fox bids him be gone and then, on the way home, has a good laugh over the whole ploy.  This story is also strongly illustrated.  My versions now include Arabic, Italian, Bengali, Urdu, Swahili, French, Polish, Arabic, Russian, Tamil, Mandarin, and Somali.

I appreciate the translation of this page into Urdu by Ahsan Soomro available here: https://mobilemall.pk/fox-fables-bilingual-by-casey-and-Iago.html.