Aesop's Fables > Books of Fables > Series Books > Lion Fables Bilingual by Jan Ormerod

Lion Fables Bilingual by Jan Ormerod

 

2007 Fábulas del León/Lion Fables.  Jan Ormerod; Spanish translation by Marta Belen Saez-Cabero.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $8.42 from World of Books through eBay, Feb., '18. 

This is a large-format (11" x 9 1/4") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge."  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  Someday I may run into a whole group of them on sale. 

2007 Fabulat e Luanit/Lion Fables.  Jan Ormerod; Albanian Translation by Viola Baynes.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $20 from BookZeller through Amazon, Dec., '19.

This is a large-format (11" x 9 1/4") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge" in Albanian and English.  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  I now have simplified Chinese, French, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and Albanian with Tamil and Bengali on the way.

2007 Lion Fables. Jan Ormerod. Paperbound. London: Mantra Lingua Ltd. AUD 27.95 from Asia Bookroom, Macquarie, Australia, July, '09.

This is a large-format (11" x 9¼") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge." The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green. LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes. The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever. "Who knows, one day I might even save your life." The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net. "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in Panchatantra and KD circles. Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food. Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer. So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger. The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives. Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish. This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion. The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good. There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables. The book is Talking Pen enabled. This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables. Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side! Someday I may run into a whole group of them on sale.

2007 Lion Fables/Basni o Pev.  Jan Ormerod; Russian translation by Dr. Lydia Buravova.  Jan Ormerod.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  AU $21.18 from Supranews, Australia, March, '14, through eBay.

Here is a yet another bilingual edition of Ormerod's Lion Fables, joining those offering French and simplified Chinese to accompany their English.  As I wrote there, this is a large-format (11" x 9¼") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge."  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  Someday I may run into a whole group of them on sale.

2007 Lion Fables Bengali and English.  Jan Ormerod; Bengali Translation by Raihana Mahbub.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd..  $8.95 from BookZeller through Amazon, Jan., '20.

This is a large-format (11" x 9 1/4") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge" in Bengali and English.  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  I now have Bengali, simplified Chinese, French, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and Albanian with Tamil on the way.

2007 Lion Fables/Les Fables du Lion.  Jan Ormerod; French translation by Annie Arnold.  Illustrated by Jan Ormerod.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $21.45 from Better World Books, Nov., '13. 

Here is a partner to another bilingual edition of Ormerod's Lion Fables, that one in simplified Chinese and this one in French.  As I wrote there, this is a large-format (11" x 9¼") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge."  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  Someday I may run into a whole group of them on sale.

2007 Lion Fables Tamil and English.  Jan Ormerod; Tamil Translation by Siva Pillai.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $38.37 from World Language Resources through Amazon, Jan., '20.

This is a large-format (11" x 9 1/4") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge" in Tamil and English.  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  I now have Bengali, simplified Chinese, French, Spanish, Russian, Tamil, Vietnamese, and Albanian.

2007 Truyen Ngu Ngon ve Su Tu/Lion Fables.  Jan Ormerod; Vietnamese translation by Ben Lovett and Nguyen Thu Hien.  Paperbound.  London: Mantra Lingua Ltd.  $6.77 from Thriftbooks through eBay, May, '18.

This is a large-format (11" x 9 1/4") landscape book presenting two fables: LM and "The Hare's Revenge."  The illustrations seem to use about three or four colors, typically tan, brown, pink, and green.  LM uses the green effectively for the lion's eyes.  The mouse promises when caught to be the lion's friend forever.  "Who knows, one day I might even save your life."  The mouse needs apparently almost a full twenty-four hours to gnaw the lion free from his net.  "The Hare's Revenge" is labeled as a Malaysian fable, but its main "trick" is well known in "Panchatantra" and KD circles.  Here there is no agreement of all the animals to supply the lion with food.  Rather, hare has had to listen to the lion's boasting too often and can stand it no longer.  So he gets his revenge in the way the KD story follows, that is, by getting the lion jealous of a (fictive) lion who claims to be stronger.  The hare then leads the lion to the well where this supposed rival lives.  Here, in a fine illustration repeated on the cover, the lion's eyes are not green but reddish.  This version does not include the fictive rabbit captured by the fictive lion.  The final picture of the lion leaping into the well is particularly good.  There are suggestions for teachers for both fables on a page between the two fables.  The book is Talking Pen enabled.  This book is one of some eighteen bilingual editions combining other languages with English for these fables.  Unfortunately, they are a little on the expensive side!  I now have Arabic (twice, 2006 and 2012), Urdu, Swahili, Polish, French, Bengali, and Italian.  Someday I may run into a whole group of them on sale.

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