Semrad Lecture

The Susan and Dan Semrad Endowed Lecture Series in Non-Western Thought

The lecture series, inaugurated in 2002, is named to recognize the generosity of Susan and Dan Semrad in endowing an annual lecture in non-Western thought.  Daniel J. Semrad graduated from Creighton’s College of Business in 1971.  Dan has worked in Lincoln as an investment broker since 1976, joining the firm of A.C. Edwards & Sons in 1983.

The purpose of the lecture series is to broaden Creighton by bringing prominent scholars in non-Western thought to address students, faculty, staff, and the general public.  The series of Semrad Lectures should open up a lively exchange of ideas that fosters intercultural understanding and dialogue.  The lecture series is administered by the Department of Philosophy in consultation with the College of Business.


Michael Brannigan, The College of Saint Rose

"Aidagara, Climate, and Tohoku"


Olufemi Taiwo, Seattle University

"What's Modernity Got To Do With It?"


Henry Rosemont Jr., Brown University

"On Retributive, Distributive, and Restorative Justice: A Confucian Meditation"


Scott L. Pratt, University of Oregon

"Creation and Liberation:  The Ontology of American Indian Origins"


Stephen H. Phillips, University of Texas, Austin

"Teacher Even of the Ancients': Yoga-sutra 1.26"


Philip J. Ivanhoe, City University of Hong Kong

"Lessons from the Past: Zhang Xuecheng and the Ethical Dimensions of History"


Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze, DePaul University 

“Reason and Culture: Understanding the African Experience”


Daniel Ehnhom, University of Virginia  

“Elements of South Asian Iconography”


Anne Waters, University of New Mexico 

“Shifting for Balance on the Horizon”


Arindam Chakradbarti, University of Hawaii at Manoa

“Just Words, Unjust Words: Ethics of Speech from Mahabharata to Foucault”


Kwasi Wiredu, University of South Florida

“Concepts of Mind and Spirit in African Thought”


Jitendra N. Mohanty, Temple University and Emory University

“Common Myths about Indian Philosophy”


Roger Ames, University of Hawaii at Manoa

“Chinese Religiousness: Making This Life Significant”