URGENT ACTION APPEAL
- From Amnesty International USA

To read the current Urgent Action newsletter, go to
www.amnestyusa.org/urgent/newslett.html
----------------------------------
For a print-friendly version of this Urgent Action (PDF):
http://www.amnestyusa.org/actioncenter/actions/uaa08910.pdf  

21 April 2010

UA 89/10             Forcible Eviction

BRAZIL             250 Guarani-Kaiowa Indigenous people

Around 250 Guarani-Kaiowa Indigenous people are at risk of eviction from ancestral lands they recently occupied in the Brazilian midwest. If evicted they will be forced to live in precarious conditions by the side of a highway.

On 25 November 2009, the Guarani-Kaiowa community of Kurussu Amba, reoccupied a small part of their ancestral lands on farmlands by the Rio Verde river in the midwestern Brazilian municipality of Coronel Sapucaia. Until then, they had been encamped by the side of the MS-289 highway. On 10 March, a local judge issued an eviction order. Lawyers working on behalf of the Indigenous community lodged an appeal against the decision in the Regional Federal Court, but this appeal has not yet been heard. The Guarani-Kaiowa community of Kurussu Amba could be evicted at any time.

The community has lived by the side of the highway for four years, periodically staging reoccupations. During this period they have been subjected to constant threats and violence. In 2007, during another eviction following a reoccupation, Indigenous leader Xulita Lopes was shot dead by gunmen; later that year another Indigenous leader Ortiz Lopes was also shot dead. In November 2009, the community complained of threats from armed men.

Living conditions on the hard shoulder of the highway are extremely precarious, with inadequate supplies of food, water, basic sanitation and medical care. Since 2007, three children have died of malnutrition in the community.

The farmlands that the Kurussu Amba community are occupying should already have been identified by the authorities, as a part of an agreement between prosecutors, the federal government and indigenous leaders in 2007. However, a series of legal challenges has stalled this process, placing this community, along with many others, at risk of violent eviction and destitution.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Mato Grosso do Sul state contains some of the smallest, poorest and most densely populated Indigenous areas in Brazil: rural pockets of poverty surrounded by large soya and sugar cane plantations and cattle ranches where life is plagued by ill-health and squalid living conditions. Some 40,000 Guarani-Kaiowa Indigenous people live a precarious existence – social breakdown has led to high levels of violence, suicide and malnutrition. Frustrated at the slowness of the land demarcation process, the Guarani-Kaiowa have begun reoccupying ancestral lands, but have been subjected to intimidation and violent evictions.

In November 2007 the Ministry of Justice, the Federal Public Prosecutor’s Office, FUNAI and 23 Indigenous leaders, signed an agreement (Termo de Ajustamento de Conduta, TAC) which commits FUNAI to identify 36 different Guarani-Kaiowa ancestral lands - including Kurussu Amba land - by April 2010, to be handed over. The state government and the farming lobby have opposed the process, exaggerating the amount of land that could be identified as Indigenous in the media, and repeatedly trying to block the process judicially. There are currently over 80 appeals being heard in the Regional Federal Court (Tribunal Regional Federal) involving Indigenous land in Mato Grosso do Sul.

The Kurussu Amba community is one of several Guarani-Kaiowa communities who have left the overcrowded reservations and set up shacks by the side of the highway, near their ancestral lands. They have been subject to repeated threats from gunmen linked to local farmers. Four community members have been shot and three killed since 2007. Investigations have been inadequate and no one has yet been prosecuted for these crimes. Small children, pregnant women and the elderly have been living for years in totally inadequate housing, with poor healthcare and no access to basic services, including water. The community has repeatedly denounced their situation to local and federal authorities. Lack of any concrete action has resulted in a several attempts to reoccupy their ancestral lands.

Indigenous peoples enjoy specific rights under international standards. The two key standards that deal with Indigenous Peoples’ rights are International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention No. 169 concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007. Brazil was an early participant in the UN Working Groups that drafted the Declaration and voted for its adoption, noting that Indigenous Peoples in Brazil “were crucial to the development of society at every level, including the development of spiritual and cultural life for all.”

Together, Convention No. 169 and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provide a robust normative framework. They affirm Indigenous Peoples’ right to their traditional lands, along with their right to free, prior and informed consent in relation to developments that may affect these lands.

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send appeals to arrive as quickly as possible:
- Calling on the federal authorities to challenge all eviction orders which put Indigenous Peoples at risk of violence or destitution;
- Urging the authorities to thoroughly investigate all allegations of threats against the Kurussu Amba community, and guarantee their security;
- Urging the authorities to fulfill their obligations under the International Labor Organization’s Convention 169, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Brazilian constitution by completing all outstanding land demarcations.

APPEALS TO:

Federal Minister of Justice
Exmo. Sr. Tarso Genro
Esplanada dos Ministerios,
Bloco ‘‘T’‘
70712-902 - Brasilia/DF BRAZIL
Fax: 011 55 61 3322 6817
Salutation: Exmo. Sr. Ministro

Federal Human Rights Secretary
Secretaria Especial de Direitos Humanos
Exmo. Secretario Especial
Sr. Paulo de Tarso Vannuchi
Esplanada dos Ministerios - Bloco ‘‘T’‘ - 4º andar,
70064-900 - Brasilia/DF BRAZIL
Fax: 011 55 61 3226 7980
Salutation: Exmo. Sr. Secretario

COPIES TO:

Conselho Indigenista Missionario, (CIMI – local NGO)
CIMI Regional Mato Grosso do Sul
Av. Afonso Pena,
1557 Sala 208 Bl.B
79002-070 Campo Grande/MS BRAZIL

Ambassador Antonio de Aguiar Patriota
Brazilian Embassy
3006 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington DC 20008
Fax: 1 202 238 2827
Email: ambassador@brasilemb.org

PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY.
Check with the AIUSA Urgent Action office if sending appeals after 2 June 2010.

__________________________________________________________________

URGENT ACTION APPEAL
- From Amnesty International USA

To read the current Urgent Action newsletter, go to
www.amnestyusa.org/urgent/newslett.html
----------------------------------
For a print-friendly version of this Urgent Action (PDF):
www.amnestyusa.org/actioncenter/actions/uaa07410.pdf

1 April 2010

UA 74/10 - Forcible return/Risk of torture

ITALY          Avni Er (m), Turkish national

Avni Er, a Turkish man detained in Italy, is at risk of being forcibly returned to Turkey where he would be at risk of torture or other ill-treatment.

Avni Er is currently held in an identification and expulsion center (CIE) in the city of Bari, southern Italy. His lawyers are appealing against the Italian courts' rejection of his request for asylum and international protection. The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) had already ordered the Italian authorities not to expel Avni Er until the first instance decision on his request for asylum and international protection had been taken. His lawyers have asked the ECtHR to extend this order until the appeal decision. However, the Italian authorities may decide to expel Avni Er before his appeal is heard.

Avni Er, who left Turkey in 1982 at the age of 11 and never returned, was arrested on 1 April 2004 as part of an international police operation against people suspected of terrorism-related offenses. He was convicted in December 2006 by a court in Perugia for membership of the illegal organization Revolutionary People's Salvation Party – Front (DHKP-C) and sentenced to seven years' imprisonment followed by expulsion from Italy. In April 2007 the Turkish authorities requested his extradition to Turkey in connection with membership of the DHKP-C. This request was denied by the Italian authorities on the basis that he would be at risk of being tried twice for the same offense. However, proceedings against Avni Er appear to be still open in Turkey. This means that Avni Er is likely to be arrested on his arrival in Turkey. Amnesty International considers that there is a significant risk that Avni Er could be subjected to torture or other ill-treatment and an unfair trial if forcibly returned to Turkey, as members of the DHKP-C have been tortured and ill-treated there in recent years.

Under the principle of international law known as non-refoulement, Italy must not return anyone to a country where they would face torture or other ill-treatment or any other serious human rights violations.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Italy is obliged under international and regional law to not expel or return an individual to a country where they would be at risk of persecution or other serious human rights violations. The principle of non-refoulement is contained in the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol, the European Convention on Human Rights; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. Italy is a party to all these treaties.

Amnesty International's research has shown that torture and other ill-treatment persist in places of detention in Turkey, including police stations and prisons where Avni Er is likely to be held. Reported cases of torture and other ill-treatment have increased within the last two years. Amnesty international considers that those accused of terrorism-related offenses are at a higher risk of being subjected to torture and other ill-treatment while in police detention and prison. Amnesty International has documented cases of torture and other ill-treatment while in police detention and in prison of people suspected of sympathizing with the DHKP-C, such as that of Engin Çeber, who died on 10 October 2008 as a result of torture, and of others arrested with him.

Past prosecutions of those suspected of carrying out offenses on behalf of the DHKP-C also raise concerns that Avni Er's life would be at risk in prison. In the prosecution for the murder of prominent businessman Özdemir Sabanci, Mustafa Duyar, a defendant in the case and an alleged member of DHKP-C, was killed in prison in 1999 while being held in pre-trial detention, allegedly by individuals with links to state institutions.

Amnesty International has also documented a continuing pattern of unfair trials under anti-terrorism legislation leading to convictions based on insubstantial or unreliable evidence, often obtained through torture. In the 2006 Amnesty International report, Turkey Justice Delayed and Denied: The persistence of protracted and unfair trials for those charged under anti-terrorism legislation, the organization recorded widespread violations of fair trial rights including denial of access to legal counsel during interrogation, inadequate medical examinations, failure to investigate allegations of torture or other ill-treatment in police custody, use of statements allegedly extracted under torture or other ill-treatment as evidence, and violation of the right to trial within a reasonable time. Since the publication of that report, Amnesty International continues to receive information about unfair trials and the persistence of violations listed in the report. In September 2008, for example, Selahattin Ökten was sentenced to life imprisonment for taking part in armed activities for the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) after he was convicted on the basis of an insubstantial witness statement allegedly obtained under torture (see Amnesty International Report 2009).

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send appeals to arrive as quickly as possible:
- Calling on the Italian authorities not to forcibly return Avni Er to Turkey, where he would be at risk of torture and other ill-treatment, as this would violate their obligations under the principle of international law known as non-refoulement.


APPEALS TO:

Minister of the Interior
Roberto Maroni, Ministro dell'Interno
Ministero dell'Interno
Palazzo Viminale
Piazza del Viminale, 1
00184 Roma, ITALY
Fax: 011 39 06 46549832
Email: liberta.civiliimmigrazione@interno.it
Salutation: Dear Minister

Prefect
Carlo Schilardi
Prefetto della Provincia di Bari
Palazzo di Governo
Piazza Liberta', 1
Bari, ITALY
Fax: 011 39 080 5293198
Email: prefettura.bari@interno.it
Salutation: Dear Prefect


COPIES TO:

Questore (Head of Police)
Dott. Giorgio Manari
Questura di Bari
Via G. Murat Nr. 4
70100 Bari, ITALY
Fax: 011 39 080 5291154

Ambassador Giulio Terzi di Sant'Agata
Embassy of Italy
3000 Whitehaven St NW
Washington DC 20008
Fax: 1 202 518 2151
Email: politici.washington@esteri.it (Political Affairs Office)


PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY.
Check with the AIUSA Urgent Action office if sending appeals after 13 May 2010.

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URGENT ACTION APPEAL
- From Amnesty International USA

To read the current Urgent Action newsletter, go to
www.amnestyusa.org/urgent/newslett.html
----------------------------------
For a print-friendly version of this Urgent Action (PDF):
http://www.amnestyusa.org/actioncenter/actions/uaa07110.pdf  

26 March 2010

UA 71/10                Death penalty

BAHRAIN             Russell Mezan (m)

A 26-year-old Bangladeshi man, Russell Mezan, was sentenced to death by the High Criminal Court of Bahrain on 23 March after being convicted of murdering a Kuwaiti man. Russell Mezan’s lawyer says he has appealed against the sentence.

According to press reports from Bahrain, Russell Mezan was sentenced to death on 23 March by the High Criminal Court of Bahrain after he was convicted of murdering a Kuwaiti man in a hotel in Manama on 7 March 2009. Russell Mezan is alleged to have offered sexual services as an exchange for money to his victim on several occasions before and on the night of the murder. The press reports say that Russell Mezan has confessed to the murder.

Russell Mezan’s lawyer has confirmed to Amnesty International on 25 March that he lodged an appeal against the sentence on the same day the sentence was issued, as Russell Mezan says that he and the Kuwaiti man were drunk and that he did not intend to kill him. The case will now be heard before the Supreme Appeal Court in the next few weeks. If the appeal fails and the death sentence is then ratified by the King, Russell Mezan will face execution. Executions are usually carried out by firing squad.

The death penalty is rarely used in Bahrain. In the last five years, around six people have been sentenced to death Most of those sentenced to death in recent years have been foreign migrant workers, mostly from developing countries. Migrant workers make up a large proportion of Bahrain’s workforce. In December 2006, three Bangladeshi nationals were executed, the first people to be put to death in Bahrain since 1996.

In December 2008, the Bahraini government abstained in the vote for a UN General Assembly resolution calling for moratorium on executions. The resolution was passed by a vote of 106 in favor to 46 against, with 34 abstentions.

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send appeals to arrive as quickly as possible:
- Expressing concern about the death sentence imposed on Russell Mezan, while making it clear that you recognize the seriousness of the crime of which he has been convicted.
- Acknowledging that the government has the right and responsibility to bring to justice those responsible for criminal offences, but expressing unconditional opposition to the death penalty as it is the ultimate cruel, inhumane and degrading punishment.
- Urging that the death sentence on Russell Mezan should be commuted by the King if it is confirmed by the appeal court.

APPEALS TO:

The King
His Majesty Shaikh Hamad bin Issa Al Khalifa
King of Bahrain
Office of His Majesty the King
P. O. Box 555
Rifa’a Palace, KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN
Fax: 011 973 1766 8884
Salutation: Your Majesty

The Minister of State for Foreign Affairs
His Excellency Nizar al-Baharna
Minister of State for Foreign Affairs
P.O. Box 1000, al-Manama, BAHRAIN
Fax: 011 973 17212603
Email: mofa@batelco.com.bh
Salutation: Your Excellency

The Minister of Justice and Islamic Affairs
Shaikh Khaled bin Ali al-Khalifa
Minister of Justice and Islamic Affairs Ministry of Justice
and Islamic affairs
P.O. Box 450, al- Manama, BAHRAIN
Fax: 011 973 17536343
Salutation: Your Excellency

COPIES TO:

Ambassador Houda Ezra Ebrahim Nonoo
Embassy of the Kingdom of Bahrain
3502 International Dr. NW
Washington DC 20008
Fax: 1 202 362 2192
Email: ambsecretary@bahrainembassy.org

PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY.
Check with the AIUSA Urgent Action office if sending appeals after 7 May 2010.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

URGENT ACTION APPEAL
- From Amnesty International USA

To read the current Urgent Action newsletter, go to
www.amnestyusa.org/urgent/newslett.html
----------------------------------
For a print-friendly version of this Urgent Action (PDF):
http://www.amnestyusa.org/actioncenter/actions/uaa04810.pdf  

4 March 2010

UA 48/10                      Fear for safety

MEXICO                      Estela Angeles Mondragon (f)
                                      Her daughter (f)

Lawyer Ernesto Rabago Martinez was shot and killed in his office in Chihuahua City, northern Mexico. He and his female partner, Estela Angeles Mondragon, had previously been threatened and attacked because of their legal work for an Indigenous community involved in a land dispute. Estela Angeles Mondragon and her daughter are in grave danger.

Ernesto Rabago was shot and killed on 2 March in the office he shares with his partner, Estela Mondragon. The two lawyers had been representing a group of Raramuri Indigenous People from the village of Bakeachi, in Carichi municipality, Chihuahua state. Part of the land the group live on is occupied illegally by ranchers. On 5 February, an Agrarian Tribunal, a court which rules on land disputes, ordered that the ranchers should leave the land and return it to the Indigenous community. Both Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon have supported “Bowerasa”, a charity set up to deliver health, education and legal services to the Indigenous community of Bakeachi.

On 18 February, the daughter of Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon was shot in the arm while she was sitting in her car parked in the garage of her home. According to Estela Mondragon, the authorities did not investigate the possibility that the attack may be linked to the work of the girl’s parents. Before then, Estela Mondragon had reported to the authorities that she had been threatened on several occasions in relation to her work and that on 28 March 2009, two homemade explosive devices were thrown at Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon’s office, setting it on fire. However, no protection measures had been put in place.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Human rights defenders in Mexico face threats, attacks, politically motivated criminal charges and imprisonment for leading protests or promoting respect for human rights. The government has agreed to provide protection measures to defenders at risk, but has yet to develop a mechanism for delivering effective and credible protection in many cases. In particular, the investigations into those behind threats and attacks rarely result in the prosecution of perpetrators; impunity is the general rule in these cases, leaving open the possibility of further attacks. For more information, please read Amnesty International’s latest report: “Standing up for justice and dignity. Human rights defenders in Mexico”, www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/AMR41/032/2009/en

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send appeals to arrive as quickly as possible:
- Calling for Estela Mondragon and her daughter to receive effective protection, in consultation with them and in accordance with their wishes;
- Calling for a full, prompt and impartial investigation into the killing of Ernesto Rabago in Chihuahua on 2 March including all possible links to his professional activity;
- Reminding the authorities of their commitment to uphold the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders which recognizes the legitimacy of the activities of human rights defenders and their right to carry out their activities without obstacles or fear of reprisals.

APPEALS TO:

Minister of the Interior
Lic. Fernando Francisco Gomez-Mont
Secretario de Gobernacion
Bucareli 99, 1er. piso, Col. Juarez,
Delegacion Cuauhtemoc, Mexico D.F.,
06600, MEXICO
Fax: 011 52 55 5093 3414
Email: secretario@segob.gob.mx
Salutation: Sr. Ministro/Dear Minister

Governor of Chihuahua State
Lic. Jose Reyes Baeza Terrazas
Gobernador del Estado de Chihuahua,
Palacio de Gobierno,
1er piso, C. Aldama #901, Col. Centro,
Chihuahua, Estado de Chihuahua, C.P. 31000, MEXICO
Fax: 011 52 614 429 3300 (then dial extension 11066 when prompted)
Email: gobernador@chihuahua.gob.mx
Salutation: Dear Governor/Senor Gobernador

Attorney General of Chihuahua state
Patricia Gonzalez Rodriguez
Procuradora del Estado de Chihuahua
Procuraduria General de Justicia del Estado
Vicente Guerrero 616, Col. Centro
Chihuahua 31000, MEXICO
Email: pagonzalez@buzon.chihuahua.gob.mx
Salutation: Dear Attorney General/ Senora Procuradora General

COPIES TO:

Human rights organization
Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres,
Av. Juarez 4107/B,
Chihuahua, MEXICO
Email: accion@cedehm.org.mx

Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan Casamitjana
Embassy of Mexico
1911 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington DC 20006
Fax: 1 202 728 1698
Email: mexembusa@sre.gob.mx

PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY.
Check with the AIUSA Urgent Action office if sending appeals after 15 April 2010.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

URGENT ACTION APPEAL
- From Amnesty International USA

To read the current Urgent Action newsletter, go to
www.amnestyusa.org/urgent/newslett.html
----------------------------------
For a print-friendly version of this Urgent Action (PDF):
http://www.amnestyusa.org/actioncenter/actions/uaa04810.pdf  

4 March 2010

UA 48/10                      Fear for safety

MEXICO                      Estela Angeles Mondragon (f)
                                      Her daughter (f)

Lawyer Ernesto Rabago Martinez was shot and killed in his office in Chihuahua City, northern Mexico. He and his female partner, Estela Angeles Mondragon, had previously been threatened and attacked because of their legal work for an Indigenous community involved in a land dispute. Estela Angeles Mondragon and her daughter are in grave danger.

Ernesto Rabago was shot and killed on 2 March in the office he shares with his partner, Estela Mondragon. The two lawyers had been representing a group of Raramuri Indigenous People from the village of Bakeachi, in Carichi municipality, Chihuahua state. Part of the land the group live on is occupied illegally by ranchers. On 5 February, an Agrarian Tribunal, a court which rules on land disputes, ordered that the ranchers should leave the land and return it to the Indigenous community. Both Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon have supported “Bowerasa”, a charity set up to deliver health, education and legal services to the Indigenous community of Bakeachi.

On 18 February, the daughter of Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon was shot in the arm while she was sitting in her car parked in the garage of her home. According to Estela Mondragon, the authorities did not investigate the possibility that the attack may be linked to the work of the girl’s parents. Before then, Estela Mondragon had reported to the authorities that she had been threatened on several occasions in relation to her work and that on 28 March 2009, two homemade explosive devices were thrown at Ernesto Rabago and Estela Mondragon’s office, setting it on fire. However, no protection measures had been put in place.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Human rights defenders in Mexico face threats, attacks, politically motivated criminal charges and imprisonment for leading protests or promoting respect for human rights. The government has agreed to provide protection measures to defenders at risk, but has yet to develop a mechanism for delivering effective and credible protection in many cases. In particular, the investigations into those behind threats and attacks rarely result in the prosecution of perpetrators; impunity is the general rule in these cases, leaving open the possibility of further attacks. For more information, please read Amnesty International’s latest report: “Standing up for justice and dignity. Human rights defenders in Mexico”, www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/AMR41/032/2009/en

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send appeals to arrive as quickly as possible:
- Calling for Estela Mondragon and her daughter to receive effective protection, in consultation with them and in accordance with their wishes;
- Calling for a full, prompt and impartial investigation into the killing of Ernesto Rabago in Chihuahua on 2 March including all possible links to his professional activity;
- Reminding the authorities of their commitment to uphold the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders which recognizes the legitimacy of the activities of human rights defenders and their right to carry out their activities without obstacles or fear of reprisals.

APPEALS TO:

Minister of the Interior
Lic. Fernando Francisco Gomez-Mont
Secretario de Gobernacion
Bucareli 99, 1er. piso, Col. Juarez,
Delegacion Cuauhtemoc, Mexico D.F.,
06600, MEXICO
Fax: 011 52 55 5093 3414
Email: secretario@segob.gob.mx
Salutation: Sr. Ministro/Dear Minister

Governor of Chihuahua State
Lic. Jose Reyes Baeza Terrazas
Gobernador del Estado de Chihuahua,
Palacio de Gobierno,
1er piso, C. Aldama #901, Col. Centro,
Chihuahua, Estado de Chihuahua, C.P. 31000, MEXICO
Fax: 011 52 614 429 3300 (then dial extension 11066 when prompted)
Email: gobernador@chihuahua.gob.mx
Salutation: Dear Governor/Senor Gobernador

Attorney General of Chihuahua state
Patricia Gonzalez Rodriguez
Procuradora del Estado de Chihuahua
Procuraduria General de Justicia del Estado
Vicente Guerrero 616, Col. Centro
Chihuahua 31000, MEXICO
Email: pagonzalez@buzon.chihuahua.gob.mx
Salutation: Dear Attorney General/ Senora Procuradora General

COPIES TO:

Human rights organization
Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres,
Av. Juarez 4107/B,
Chihuahua, MEXICO
Email: accion@cedehm.org.mx

Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan Casamitjana
Embassy of Mexico
1911 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington DC 20006
Fax: 1 202 728 1698
Email: mexembusa@sre.gob.mx

PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY.
Check with the AIUSA Urgent Action office if sending appeals after 15 April 2010.

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