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Creighton International Moot Court Team Sweeps Regional, Heading to National

For the first time ever, Creighton University School of Law's Jessup International Moot Court Team won the Midwest Regional Championship in St. Paul, Minn., over the weekend. Creighton advances to the International Finals and will compete against other regional U.S. champions and foreign national champions for the Shearman & Sterling Cup in Washington, D.C., at the end of March.

The law school's team was composed of Mark Kratina and William Andres of Omaha, April Franklin of Highlands, N.C., and J. Adam Peterson of Roseburg, Ore.; led by David Noteboom of Sioux Falls, S.D., coach and brief writer; and advised by Creighton International Law Professor Michael Kelly. Creighton won fourth-best brief overall and swept the preliminary oral rounds, with Katrina/Andres defeating teams from the University of Colorado and St. Thomas, and Franklin/Peterson defeating teams from UNLV and Penn State.

The Jessup International Moot Court Regional Competition is organized annually by the International Law Students Association (ILSA) with the support of the American Society of International Law (ASIL). The Jessup problem is based on a fictitious pair of countries who have brought their international legal dispute to the International Court of Justice in The Hague. This is an open research competition, which allows for about four months of preparation.

Participation in an open research competition with a longer preparation timetable is very different from a short, limited competition. However, because the Jessup problem generally hits upon at least one issue in international law that has not been explored or very little has been done on that issue, one of the competitionís great benefits is that students become almost as knowledgeable as international legal experts on that issue. The longer schedule is also conducive to less-frenzied preparation and greater development of both legal writing and oral argument skills.

Posted: 2/23/06