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Creighton Conference Looks at Interfaith Dialogue in the Shadow of 9/11

Creighton Conference Looks at Interfaith Dialogue in the Shadow of 9/11

Why should Jews, Christians and Muslims engage in interfaith dialogue? That question will be discussed during a conference, “Interfaith Dialogue in the Shadow of 9/11,” 1 p.m.-6:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 10, in the Creighton University V.J. and Angela Skutt Student Center Ballroom. S

Sponsored by the Kripke Center for the Study of Religion and Society, internationally recognized speakers will discuss what Jews, Christians and Muslims can learn from each other. Conference participants will also have the opportunity to talk with participants of other faith traditions.

The speakers include:

  •  Sulayman Nyang, a professor of African Studies at Howard University. He also serves as co-director of Muslims in the American Public Square, a research project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts. He has written extensively on Islamic, African and Middle Eastern affairs. His latest book, Islam in America, is scheduled to appear this fall.
  • Philip A. Cunningham, executive director of the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning and adjunct professor of theology at Boston College. The author of several articles and books, his academic interests include biblical studies, religious education, and theologies of Christian -Jewish relations.
  • Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor, director of Interfaith Affairs at the Anti-Defamation League. He is responsible for overseeing the ADL’s mission to end prejudice, bias and anti-Semitism through education and he has a long-standing reputation as an educator and lecturer, author and editor. He is the editor and principal writer of Shalom / Salaam: A Resource for Jewish / Muslim Dialogue. His most recent book is called A Jewish View of Cults.
  •  The Rev. Dirk Ficca, a Presbyterian minister. He serves as the executive director of the Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions, a non-profit, non-sectarian organization fostering interreligious encounter, dialogue and cooperative common action in metropolitan Chicago and around the world.
Posted: 9/5/06