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Posters on the Hill Presentation

Creighton Student Among 80 Undergraduate Students Chosen to Present Research at National Event

Creighton University Arts and Sciences junior Mallory Henninger will be one of nearly 80 undergraduate students from across the nation presenting results of their independent research in science, mathematics and humanities on Wednesday, April 25, 2007, in Washington D.C.

The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) will welcome the undergraduate students to Capitol Hill to display their research posters to Members of Congress, federal agency funding officers, and invited guests in rooms 338-B – 340-B of the Rayburn House Office Building from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM.

Henninger’s research was conducted under the supervision of Isabelle Cherney Ph.D, of the Department of Psychology, and was supported by a grant from Creighton University’s College of Arts & Sciences.

The students were competitively chosen from almost four hundred applicants. Their research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, NASA, and many other agencies --- federal, state, and private. The students will spend the day visiting the offices of their elected representatives and the large majority meet with one or more Representatives or Senators

“Posters on the Hill” is one of CUR's signature events, showcasing the high quality research undergraduates are capable of producing with faculty mentors and offers students the opportunity to share their personal stories and the excitement of their discoveries with members of Congress and professional scientists. 

The day concludes with a poster session attended by members of Congress, their staffs, and personnel from federal funding agencies.

CUR is a national professional association representing faculty and administrators at nearly 1000 academic institutions. CUR, and governmental and private partners, facilitates collaborative research by students and their faculty mentors. It provides students with a wide range of opportunities to learn science by doing it and provides faculty with opportunities to integrate research into their teaching.