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Creighton Student, Faculty Receive Fulbright Scholarships

Creighton Student, Faculty Receive Fulbright Scholarships

A student and two faculty members at Creighton University have received Fulbright grants.

Shawn Mann, a 2007 graduate of Creighton’s College of Business, has received a Fulbright-Garcia Robles Grant. He will conduct his research project in Mexico during the 2008-2009 academic year. Mann will take graduate courses in academic areas such as business, finance, international trade and comparative-law while working five days a week. The main focus for Fulbright-Garcia Robles Grant recipients is to acquire professional experience by working for a company or non-government organization (NGO).

Mann is one of 16 recipients of the prestigious Fulbright-Garcia Robles Grant in 2008, which honors the late U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright and the late Mexican diplomat Alfonso Garcia Robles, winner of a Nobel Peace Prize. The award, administered by COMEXUS, an independent organization funded by the governments of Mexico and the United States, sponsors study in Mexico in the areas of public administration, public policy, culture, society and politics.

Christopher Gerteis, Ph.D., associate professor of history at Creighton University, received a Fulbright research grant to support his project, titled “Blue Collar Youth and Rise of the New Left in Postwar Japan.” He will be in residence at Sophia University in Tokyo, during the 2008-2009 academic year.

Steve Virgil, director of Community Economic Development Clinic at Creighton’s School of Law, has been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship for teaching and research in the Czech Republic. Virgil will spend the spring of 2009 at Palacky University law school in Olomouc, Czech Republic. His project is to develop a model curriculum for using the law school’s resources to serve NGO’s in Eastern Europe. Virgil, working with the Czech Bar, also will research and write an article defining strategies to facilitate the development of NGO’s in the relative vacuum of post-Soviet Eastern Europe.

The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board is a 12-member board appointed by the U. S. president. It is responsible for establishing worldwide policies for the program and for selection of Fulbright recipients. The grants are made possible through funds that are appropriated annually by the U.S. Congress and, in many cases, by contributions from partner countries and/or the private sector.

As Fulbright recipients, Mann, Gerteis and Virgil will join the ranks of more than 279,000 alumni of the program. Fulbright alumni have become heads of state, judges, ambassadors, cabinet ministers, CEOs, university presidents, journalists, artists, professors and teachers. They have been awarded 36 Nobel Prizes.