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Kleeb, Johanns to Air Views on Health Care at Creighton Forum on Oct. 7

Kleeb, Johanns to Air Views on Health Care at Creighton Forum on Oct. 7

Rising health care costs and a growing shortage of health providers will be among a wide range of topics addressed by Nebraska’s U.S. senatorial candidates, Mike Johanns and Scott Kleeb, during the 20th Annual Thomas Timothy Smith, M.D., Lecture at Creighton University on Tuesday, Oct. 7.

Titled “Candidates Speak Out on Healthcare: A Public Forum,” the event is the only time the two candidates will meet before November’s general election to discuss in depth their views, solutions and experiences to address the complex problems facing the U.S. health delivery system. Daniel R. Wilson, M.D., Creighton chair of psychiatry, will moderate.

“The number of uninsured Nebraskans continues to increase, costs are rising faster than family income, more people are going into debt because of medical expenses, and it’s predicted that the Medicare Hospital trust fund will be broke by 2019,” said Richard L. O’Brien, M.D., professor with the Creighton Center for Health Policy and Ethics. “It is important to know how these candidates plan to address these problems, which are so critical to the country.”

The public forum begins at 6 p.m. at the Mike and Josie Harper Center auditorium at Creighton University, 602 N. 20 St., and continues to as late as 8 p.m., depending on audience questions. A reception with the candidates will follow. The forum, reception, public parking, and valet parking are free.

Registration is requested by calling 402.280.5659 or visiting online http://cme.creighton.edu/programs/brochures_PDFs/2008-10/10-07_TTSmith_Lecture.pdf.

The Smith lecture series is named after Dr. Thomas Timothy Smith, an otolaryngologist who graduated from the Creighton School of Medicine in 1933 and went on to earn a master’s degree in medicine from the University of Pennsylvania. He dedicated himself extensively to the education of students, residents and physicians and played a leadership role in the planning of what today is the Boys Town National Research Hospital.