Public Relations  >  News Center  >  News Releases  >  November, 2009  >  November 3, 2009  >  Students Showcase Undergraduate Research Projects
Students Showcase Undergraduate Research Projects

Students Showcase Undergraduate Research Projects

Harvey and Davidson describe their projects

Eleven Creighton University undergraduate students, who participated in the 2009 Ferlic Summer Research Scholar program, showcased their original research at the fourth annual poster presentation on Monday, Nov. 2.

The posters are summaries of what the students learned and discovered over the summer on topics including tooth remineralization, the role of butterflies in the eco-nature of the prairie, and understanding the molecular structure and growth of bacteria.

Nearly half of Creighton’s undergraduates intend to major in science; five times the national average.    

The undergraduate summer research projects are made possible by the generosity and support of Randolph M. Ferlic M.D., and his wife, Teresa Kolars Ferlic.  A graduate of Creighton, Ferlic earned his Bachelor of Science degree in 1958, and graduated from the School of Medicine in 1961. He has been a dedicated educator and an ardent supporter of higher education in Nebraska.
  
 “There are five critical elements that lead to personal success—availability, amenability, ability, creativity and passion.  What I have witnessed today are students who possess all these qualities,” said Ferlic at the presentation ceremony.     
According to James Fletcher, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and administrator of the program, these research opportunities are important for teaching students about the pursuit of new knowledge.  In many of this year’s projects the scholars sought to investigate underlying mechanisms of disease, improve the understanding of disease-causing organisms or examine new potential therapeutic treatments.  

Participating students, the department they worked in and their research topic included:

Michael Davidson ( Chemistry) “Tooth Remineralization”

Hannah Enloe ( Biology)
“Stable Transfection of Black Fly (Simuliidae) Cultured Cells with GFP-Zeo-R Vector”

Rebecca Harvey ( Biology)
“Prairie Butterflies of Conservation Concern and Effects of Prairie Restorations”

Salima Hasham ( Biology)
“Staphylococcus Aureus”

David Jung (Chemistry)
“Multidentate Organometallic Complexes as New Multivalent Enzyme Inhibitors”

Ben Kafka (Chemistry)
“Development of Click Synthetic Tools for Redox Biosensor Fabrication”

Megan Lewandowski (Chemistry)
“Synthesis of Molecules by Click Reaction to Inhibit the Enzyme Ftase”

Benjamin Owen (Biology)
“Phagocytosis of Monocytes, Macrophages and Heterophils in Attwater's Prairie Chicken”

Danielle Renner (Chemistry)
“Antibiotic Development by Investigation of the glmS Riboswitch”

Sarah Roszhart (Chemistry)
“Development of an Electrochemiluminescent Biosensor using Micromolded Carbon Electrodes”

Shelby Takeshita (Biology)
“Investigation of the Efficacy of Nanoparticle Antiretroviral Drug Delivery Systems”