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Creighton Scores High on Engagement Survey

Creighton Scores High on Engagement Survey

Creighton seniors are significantly more engaged in class work, had more meaningful mentoring relationships with faculty, saw their coursework as relevant, useful and applicable to their academic success and future plans and had a better understanding of the issues facing their community, nation, and world than did seniors from other institutions, according to a college student survey conducted by the Higher Education Institute at UCLA.

The survey was administered to 5,000 students at nine private schools and 10,000 students at four-year universities and colleges in the spring of 2009. More than 540 Creighton seniors completed the survey.

Students were asked to rate their respective university on the following:

  • Academic achievement and engagement
  • Active and collaborative learning
  • Student-faculty interaction
  • Cognitive and affective development
  • Satisfaction with the college experience
  • Degree aspirations and career plans

Creighton students were:

  • 94 percent satisfied with the overall quality of instruction
  • 86 percent satisfied with their overall college experience
  • 82 percent would not hesitate to enroll again at Creighton

Creighton seniors were also more likely to report having opportunities to apply classroom learning to “real life” issues, having contact and regular communication with faculty who provide emotional support and encouragement, studying and interacting with fellow students and participating in volunteer and service work.

Longitudinal data indicated the life goals concerned with influencing social values, helping others who have difficulty, developing a meaningful philosophy of life, participating in community action programs, interest in sustainability efforts and integrating spirituality into their lives were statistically more important as seniors than as freshmen.