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Oct. 6 Creighton Event Looks at Health Care Reform

Oct. 6 Creighton Event Looks at Health Care Reform

Health care reform will be the subject of the 21st Thomas Timothy Smith, M.D., Lecture at Creighton University on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 6-7 p.m. A reception will follow.

Titled “Addressing Health Care Reform: Reality, Myths and Distortions (and) What it Means to You,” the presentation will look at the impact of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 on health providers, patients, the uninsured and others.

The event, which is free to the public, will be held in the auditorium of the Mike and Josie Harper Center for Student Life and Learning, 602 N. 20 St. Registration is requested by calling 402.280.5659 or registering online at https://etrak.creighton.edu/etrakwebapp/meetings.aspx.

The event will include presentations by Richard L. O’Brien, M.D., with Creighton and Jennifer Carter, J.D., with Nebraska Appleseed, followed by a question-and-answer session. The Rev. Andy Alexander, S.J., vice president for University Ministry, will moderate.

Carter is director of Nebraska Appleseed's Public Policy and Health Care Access Program. Appleseed has been actively involved in national health care reform for more than two years. O’Brien, former Creighton vice president for health sciences, is a professor in the University’s Center for Health Policy and Ethics and School of Medicine. He is co-chair of the Nebraska Medical Association’s Health Care Reform Task and frequently writes and speaks about the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

The Smith lecture series is named after Dr. Thomas Timothy Smith, an otolaryngologist who graduated from the Creighton School of Medicine in 1933 and went on to earn a master’s degree in medicine from the University of Pennsylvania. He dedicated himself extensively to the education of students, residents and physicians and played a leadership role in the planning of what today is the Boys Town National Research Hospital.