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Autistic Spectrum Disorders Subject of Menolascino Lecture

Jarrett Barnhill, M.D., professor of psychiatry at University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, will deliver the fourth annual Frank J. Menolascino, M.D., Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, March 16, noon-1 p.m., at Creighton University Medical Center’s Morrison Seminar Room, 601 N. 30 St.

He will speak on “Autistic Spectrum Disorders: What’s a Few Million Years Have to Do with It?” The lecture is free to the public. A reception and registration will begin at 11:30 a.m.

Barnhill specializes in the diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of autism and other develop-mental disabilities, neuropsychiatric disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome and other movement disorders, and psychiatric problems in patients with epilepsy.

Following the noon lecture, there will be additional presentations, 1:15-3:15 p.m., on diagnostic and treatment approaches for autism and developmental disabilities by several renowned experts in the field at the Boys Town National Research Hospital auditorium, adjacent to Creighton University Medical Center. The presentations are open to the public at no charge.

Presenters will include Wayne Fisher, Ph.D., director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at University of Nebraska Medical Center; Rob Fletcher, D.S.W., chief executive officer for the National Association for the Dually Diagnosed; Mark Fleisher, M.D., UNMC director of Neurodevelopmental Psychiatry Services; and Daniel R. Wilson, M.D., chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Creighton University School of Medicine.

Shelly Menolascino, M.D., and Michael Menolascino, M.D., from the Frank J. Menolascino Foundation will make closing remarks.

Creighton’s annual lecture is in memory of Frank Menolascino, M.D., longtime chair of psychiatry at Creighton University School of Medicine. Menolascino pioneered international attention to and improvements in the comprehensive and humane care of persons with mental retardation.

The Creighton School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, and Continuing Medical Education Division are sponsoring the lecture.