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Creighton Medical Match Day Provides Many Perfect Matches

For Creighton University Medical School fourth-year medical students, the luck of the Irish was with them on St. Patrick’s Day.

On March 17, 107 soon-to-be Creighton University medical graduates and their counterparts at schools of medicine across the country gathered anxiously to learn what the next few years hold in store for them. Another 12 students participated in earlier matches.

It was Medical Match Day, when most of the nation’s fourth-year medical students learned where they would pursue their graduate medical educations and what kind of doctors they would become.

For this year’s match, 100 percent of Creighton’s participating students matched into residencies with 97 percent getting their specialties of choice. Forty-three students will specialize in primary care (internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics and internal medicine/pediatrics). In all, students matched with 18 specialties, including orthopedics, dermatology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology and urology.

“This is probably the most competitive year for the match in history. To match 97 percent in their specialties of choice reflects very well on our students and on the School of Medicine,” said Michael Kavan, Ph.D., associate dean for student affairs for Creighton School of Medicine.

Students placed at medical centers in 33 US states, including such institutions as Duke, Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University, Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, University of Nebraska Medical Center, and St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. Twelve will pursue their specialties at Creighton University Medical Center.

The matches took place through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), a private, nonprofit corporation established in 1952 to provide a uniform date and time to announce placements.

The road leading to March 17 started last fall, when medical students began traveling around the country to be interviewed for graduate training programs. On Feb. 23, students submitted ranked lists to NRMP of where they preferred to be resident doctors; program administrators also submitted ranked lists of their choices of resident candidates. In the weeks leading up to Match Day, NRMP used a complicated computer algorithm to sort through thousands of choices and pair each student with a single residency program.