Public Relations  >  News Center  >  News Releases  >  October, 2013  >  October 15, 2013  >  Real Estate Bubble Topic of Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture at Creighton
Real Estate Bubble Topic of Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture at Creighton

The real estate bubble of the 2000s will be the topic of the Creighton University Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar lecture at 7 p.m. Nov. 18, in the ballroom of the Mike and Josie Harper Center. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Alexander Field, Ph.D., the Michel and Mary Orradre Professor of Economics at Santa Clara University, will present “The Real Estate Bubble of the 2000s in Historical Context: Implications for Crisis and Recovery.”

Field served as the executive director of the Economic History Association from 2004 to 2012, and as associate editor of the “Journal of Economic Literature” and editor of “Research in Economic History.” His current research centers on U.S. macroeconomic history with an emphasis on technology and productivity and is reflected in his most recent book, A Great Leap Forward: 1930s Depression and U.S. Economic Growth. The book earned the Outstanding Academic Title from Choice, the Alice Hanson Jones Biennial Prize from the Economic History Association, and the Alpha Sigma Nu National Book Award.

He is also the author of Altruistically Inclined? The Behavioral Sciences, Evolutionary Theory, and the Origins of Reciprocity, also an Alpha Sigma Nu National Book Award winner, in which he seeks to explain the origin of human altruism through the integration of the human sciences.

Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Visiting Scholar Program has been offering undergraduates the opportunity to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the intellectual life of the institution by making possible an exchange of ideas between the Visiting Scholars and the resident faculty and students.

The 13 men and women participating during 2013-2014 will visit 100 colleges and universities with chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, spending two days on each campus and taking full part in the academic life of the institution. They will meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the entire academic community. Now entering its 58th year, the Visiting Scholar Program has sent 611 Scholars on 5,004 two-day visits.