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Sustainable Agriculture Advocate to Speak at Creighton

Wes Jackson, Ph.D., a leading thinker in the international sustainable agriculture movement, will speak at 3 p.m., April 11 in the ballroom of the Harper Center on the Creighton campus. His lecture, “We Can Now Solve the Oldest Environmental Problem,” is free and open to the public.

Jackson pioneered research in Natural Systems Agriculture; his research has been featured in the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Audubon, Mac-Neil Lehrer News Hour and All Things Considered. He received a Pew Conservation Scholars award, a Right Livelihood Award, and a MacArthur fellowship. Jackson is predicted to be among the 100 “most important Americans of the 20th century” by Life Magazine and is listed as one of Smithsonian’s “35 Who Made a Difference” in 2005.

Jackson is a founder and the president of The Land Institute, a non-profit research and education organization focused on agricultural sustainability. The Land Institute has been working on the problem of agriculture for more than 30 years to develop an agriculture that will save soil from being lost or poisoned.

He’s written seven books including Becoming Native to This Place, Altars of Unhewn Stone and New Roots for Agriculture.

Jackson got his master’s degree in biology from the University of Kansas and earned his doctorate degree in genetics from North Carolina State University. He was a biology professor at Kansas Wesleyan and later established an Environmental Studies program at California State University, Sacramento, where he was a tenured full professor before he resigned to found The Land Institute.

This lecture, presented by the Environmental Science Program, is co-sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences; Departments of Biology, Sociology/Anthropology/Social Work and Atmospheric Science; Program in Justice and Peace Studies; Center for Catholic Thought; and the Environmental Science and Biology Student Clubs.