Candace Bloomquist, MS, PhD
Candace Bloomquist, MS, PhD

Candace Bloomquist, MS, PhD

Assistant Professor
Graduate School

Academic Appointments

Department

  • Interdisciplinary Studies

Position

  • Assistant Professor

Biography

I am of European ancestry with family from Germany and Sweden. My ancestors immigrated to the Minnesota area of North America in the 1800’s, then my grandparents relocated to northeast Nebraska. I was born in a rural town in northeast Nebraska and lived there for the first 18 years of my life. I developed extensive relationships across the United States and Canada through my pursuit of learning. I earned a Ph.D. in exercise psychology at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, a master’s degree in Kinesiology at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas and a bachelor’s degree at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska.
My passion for, and commitment to, health for all is a constant goal. I believe in thinking differently, challenging the status quo and reaching for opportunities. I strive to enhance the growth of individuals and organizations, to increase teamwork and personal involvement, and help others develop humility, consciousness, and compassion as change leaders. More on this below.
My research interests include trust in higher education, health equity, quality improvement, health promoting schools, and teaching and learning in higher education. My desire is to expand my research to recognize the cultural components that are present in our interconnected world which will help me continue to learn about my community. Chris Brogan, a blogger and consultant recommends choosing three words that will guide the choices you make during the year ahead. This year my three words are “Trust, Equity, Together.” These three words challenge, encourage, and inspire me. 
Prior to coming to Creighton University as an Assistant Professor, I served as a health educator in the Health Promotion Department at the Saskatoon Health Region, a regional health authority in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. I have also served in the citizen sector (a.k.a. – non-profit) at the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Saskatchewan as a community action specialist; and before that I served in the U.S. Army as a medical laboratory technician. And, before all of this I was a student-athlete competing in multiple sports throughout high school and ultimately focusing on basketball during university.
As I mentioned, I believe in thinking differently, challenging the status quo, and reaching for opportunities. And it is important for me to surround myself with people who care about making positive change for social justice through engagement and innovation. For me the essence of this is in the building of a culture of health. To build a culture of health we need leaders that are ready to enable, mediate and advocate to ensure that the strategic shifts that are coming to our health, education, business and government systems are designed with “health for all” in mind. I believe there are exciting opportunities ahead and I would like to share with you how my philosophy on teaching and learning aligns with my desire to help build a culture of health. 
My philosophy on teaching and learning is to engage and serve, build a trusting atmosphere and environment, and use stories, dialogue, and questions to illuminate ideas and solutions. My goal is to create an environment for thriving. This doesn’t mean the environment is comfortable, this means the environment is safe. Safe to explore, take risks, innovate, ask questions and celebrate the gift of the human imagination and creativity. I believe education should cultivate the courage to be uncomfortable and teach how to accept discomfort as a part of growth. The experience of wrestling with issues and coming to your own conclusions might make it a little harder to get quick and easy answers, but it also gives us the perspective and knowledge from which we can evaluate the world and a lens through which we can view the many, and quickly, changing events that make up a typical day in our world today.
There are many people who have gone before me who have thought deeply about these ideas and were willing to share their thoughts in writing: bell hooks, Brene Brown, Paulo Freire, Sir Ken Robinson, Parker Palmer, and many more. 
I practice magis and cura personalis by setting high expectations of myself and my students (using quotes from some great writers):
“If you’re comfortable, I’m not teaching and you’re not learning. It’s going to get uncomfortable in here and that’s okay. It’s normal and it’s part of the process” (Brown, 2012, p. 199).
“Without feedback there can be no transformative change. When we don’t talk to the people we’re leading about their strengths and their opportunities for growth, they begin to question their contributions and our commitment. Disengagement follows” (Brown, 2012, p. 197).
“If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original” (Robinson, 2006).
“The teacher is of course an artist, but being an artist does not mean that he or she can make the profile, can shape the students. What the educator does in teaching is to make it possible for the students to become themselves” (Horton & Freire, 1990, p. 181).
“I entered the classroom with the conviction that it was crucial for me and every other student to be an active participant, not a passive consumer...education as the practice of freedom.... education that connects the will to know with the will to become. Learning is a place where paradise can be created” (hooks, 1994, p. 14).
Brown, B. (2012). Daring greatly: how the courage to be vulnerable transforms the way we live, love, parent, and lead. New York: Penguin Random House.
hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to Transgress, New York: Routledge.
Horton, M. & Freire, P. (1990). We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
Robinson, K. (2006, February). Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity? [Video File]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity?language=en
Candace uses she/her/hers pronouns.
A more complete listing of scholarship, teaching, and research interests can be found on my Curriculum Vitae.

Education

  • Ph.D. (Exercise Psychology) University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
  • M.Sc. (Exercise Psychology) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
  • B.S. (Exercise Science) Creighton University, Omaha, NE

Publications and Presentations

Articles

  • West, K. & Bloomquist, C.B. (2015). Poetic Re-presentations on Trust in Higher Education.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5206/cjsotl-rcacea.2015.2.5, The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Volume 6; Issue 2; Article 5, 2015
  • Bloomquist, C.8., Gyurcsik, N.C., Brawley, L.R., Spink, K.S., & Bray, S.R. (2008). The road to
    exercise is filled with good intentions: Why don't rny proximal exercise intentions match my
    actions?, Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 13(2), 102-118, 2008

Publications

  • Chinta, L. & Bloomquist, C.D. (September, 2014). Phase lI: in motion Health Worþlace Evaluation Internal repoft for Health Promotion Department, Saskatoon Health Region, 2014
  • Patil, T. & Bloornquist, C.D. (Septernber,2013). Phase I; in motion Health Worþlace Evqluation Internal repoft for Health Promotion Department, Saskatoon Health Region, 2013
  • Bloornquist, C.D., Ursel, B. & Obe, O. (March, 2012). My Healthy Comnrunity Grant Application Evaluation Report for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and external partners, 2012
  • National Community Engagement Working Group (2012). Business Case: Community Engagement Consultation.Internal report for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada., 2012
  • Gillani, A. & Bloomquist, C. D. (2011) Saslcatchewan Heart Health Children & Youth Report. Internal report for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada., 2011
  • Bloomquist, C.D. (2010). Exploring the Culture of Trust within University. Bridges: Reflecting the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at the University of Saskatchewan., 8(2), 2010
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Fuller, D.L., Gyurcsik, N.C., Brawley, L.R., Spink, K.S., & Bray, S.R. (2008)
    Active Transportation Use By Sfficiently and Insfficiently Active First-Year University
    Students., Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 35 (S1), S218, 2008
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Brawley, L.R., Spink, K.S., &,Br.ay, S.R. (2006, June). The
    road linking good intentions to physical activity is paved with social-cognitivefactors:
    Mìsntatching intent and behavior., Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 28 (suppl), S36, 2006
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Baillargeon,T., & McElroy, M. (2006, June). Strategies used
    to cope with barriers to physical activity and related coping self-fficacy among first-year
    university Women., Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 28 (suppl), S35, 2006
  • Bloomqnist, C.D., Hillard, S., Gyurcsik, N.C., Hacker, T., & Morales, R. (2004, June). An
    investigation of baruiers to physical activity among women with arthritis using øn ecological
    approach., Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 26 (Suppl), S37, 2004

Editing and Reviews

  • Bloomquist, C. (2010). Negotiating trust within otr university. On Campus News. University of
    Saskatchewan., 2010
  • Bloomquist, C. (Septernber 2006).Why Exercising Feels Sooooo Good! What's Behind
    "Exercise High"? CRAM Science. http://www.cramscience.ca/articlepv.php?a=68., 2006

Presentations

  • Kryzanowski, J., Bloomquist, C.D., & Dunn-Pierce, T. (2017). Applying Quality Improvement within Health Promotion. Canadian Public Health Association, Halifax, NS., 2017
  • Kardynal, J., Oliver, H., Cram, K., Bloomquist, C.D., Aussant, J., Kryzanowski, J., & Dunn-Pierce, T. (2017). Health Equity Self-Assessment Tool for Health Promotion Practitioners. Canadian Public Health Association, Halifax, NS, 2017
  • Bloomquist, C.D., & Watts, F. (2017). Building a Culture of Trust: A Public Narrative on Learning to Trust Again. You Are Here Interdisciplinary Conference on Place, Space, and Embodiment, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, 2017
  • Bloomquist, C.B., & Watts, F. (2016). A Faculty and Student Perspective on Historical Changes in the Role of Trust and Culture in Higher Education. Nebraska Women in Higher Education Leadership (NWHEL) Conference, Omaha, NE., 2016
  • Bloomquist, C.8., Jànzen, C., Rioux, 8., & Ror, A (2014). Occupational health: A look at physical activity, nutrition, stress and tobacco use in six Canadian worksites. International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, San Diego, CA., 2014
  • Bloomquist, C.D. (2013, May). Community Based Physical Activity for Recreation Practitioners. Presentation at City of Saskatoon Aboriginal Symposium, Saskatoon, SK., 2013
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Richalds, G., & Grest, B. (August 2012). Presentation at the annual Horizon School Division Teacher Convention, Regina, SK., 2012
  • Bloomquist, C. &. Cross, S. (2012, March). Presentation at the annual Prairie Spirit Teachers' Association General Assembly, Saskatoon, SK., 2012
  • Bloomquist, C., Ursel, 8., Sinclair, M., (20ll,October). Presented at the annual conference for Saskatchewan Parks and Recreation Association, Saskatoon, SK,, 2011
  • Lovas, O., Bloomquist, C., Ursel, B. (2011, September). Presented at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute conference, Saskatoon, SK., 2011
  • Bloomquist, C., Ursel, B. & James, L. (2011, June). Presented at the Improving Health for Children conference, Elk Ridge, SK., 2011
  • West, K. & Bloomquist, C.D. (2011, June). Using the Art of Scenario Thinking to Explore How Trust Can Help Us Prepare For the Future. Symposium at the annual conference of the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Saskatoon, SK., 2011
  • Bloomquist, C.D. & West, K. (2011, June). Stories about Trust ïlithin the University. Presented at the annual conference of the Society for Teaching in Higher Education, Saskatoon, SK., 2011
  • Bloomquist, C.D., & West, K. (2009, July). Commtmity Trust: A Conversation on Learning to Trust Again Roundtable discussion at the 34th International Conference on Improving University Teaching, Simon Fraser University Burnaby, BC., 2009
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Fuller, D.L., Gyurcsik, N.C., Brawley, L.R., Spink, K.S., & Bray, S.R. (2008, March). Active Transportation Use By Sufficiently and Insufficiently Active First-Year University Students. Poster presented at the annual conference of Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM), San Diego, CA., 2008
  • Bloomquist, C.D., & Fuller, D.L. (2007, March). Active Transportcttion: Sustainable physical activity options for university students. Poster presentation at the 14th Annual Life & Health Sciences Research conference, Saskatoon, SK., 2007
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Spink, K.S., Brawley, L.R., &Bray, S.R. (2006, November). Predicting physical activity during the transition to first-year r¿niversity: Are reasons and coping self-efficacy reliable predictors? Presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Psychomotor Learning and Sport Psychology (SCAPPS), Halifax, NS., 2006
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Baillargeon,T., & McElroy, M. (2006, June). Strategies used to cope with barriers to physical activity and related coping self-efficacy among first-year university women. Poster presentation at the annual conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA), Denver, Colorado., 2006
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Brawley, L.R., Spink, K.S., &.Bray, S.R. (2006, June). The road linking good intentions to physical activity is paved with social-cognitive factors: Mismatching intent and behavior. Presented at the annual conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA), Denver, Colorado., 2006
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Gyurcsik, N.C., Baillargeon,T., & McElroy, M. (2005, November). An intervention to overcome barriers and inmprove coping self-efficacy and participation in physical activity for first-year university women. Presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Society for Psychomotor Learning and Sport Psychology (SCAPPS), Niagra Falls, ON., 2005
  • Bloomquist, C.D., Hillard, S., Gyurcsik, N.C., Hacker, T., & Morales, R. (2004, June). An investigation of barriers to physical activity among women with arthritis using an ecological approach. Presented at the annual conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA), Vancouver, British Columbia., 2004

Research and Scholarship

Research and Scholarship Interests

  • My research interests include trust in higher education, health equity, quality improvement, health promoting schools, and teaching and learning in higher education. My desire is to expand my research to recognize the cultural components that are present in our interconnected world which will help me continue to learn about my community.

Current Research Projects

    • Developing a Digital Interdisciplinary Content Platform to Study Trust
    • Using Storytelling to Build Trust and Develop Leaders in Middle School Classrooms
    • Educating the Educator About Trust in Higher Education
    • Changing the Candidacy Process in the Interdisciplinary Ed.D. Program in Leadership to Assessment for Learning

Grant Funding Received

  • Community Initiatives Fund, Physical Activity Grant, in motion Healthy Workplace Evaluation, Saskatoon Health Region - $32,000
  • Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women in Sport and Physical Activity (CAAWS), Saskatoon Newcomers On The Move - $8,000
  • JumpStart Canadian Tire, Physical Activity equipment for 8 Health Promoting Schools worth approximately $6,000
  • RBC Grant,Heart Healthy Children & Youth - $5,000
  • SaskTel TelCare, Heart Healthy Children & Youth - -$5,000
  • Eli Lily Grant, February is Heart Month - $5,000
  • Canada Summer Jobs, Practicum student salary - $6,000
  • New Faculty Scholarship Recipient, College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan - 18,000 per year doctoral scholarship
  • College of Graduate Studies & Research Travel Award (University of Saskatchewan) - $350
  • College of Graduate Studies & Research Travel Award (University of Saskatchewan)- $500
  • College of Kinesiology Travel Grant (University of Saskatchewan)- $500
  • Kansas State University Travel Grant recipient- $150
  • Kansas State University Travel Grant recipient- $200
  • Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship (CURAS) Faculty Research Fund, “Developing a Digital Interdisciplinary Content Platform to Study Trust”
  • Office for Academic Excellence and Assessment, Creighton University, Faculty Development Grant, “Changing the Candidacy Process in the Interdisciplinary Ed.D. Program in Leadership to Assessment for Learning”
  • Brimstone Award for Applied Storytelling, National Storytelling Network, “Using Storytelling to Build Trust and Develop Leaders in Middle School Classrooms”
  • IDEA Impact Grant, “Educating the Educator About Trust in Higher Education”
  • Dr. George F. Haddix President’s Faculty Research Fund, Creighton University, New Investigator Grant, “A Study in the Development of the Trust Lab”

Awards and Honors

  • Bravo Award, Saskatoon Health Region, 2014
  • Bravo Award, Saskatoon Health Region, 2014
  • Travel Award, Canadian Cancer Society, 2014
  • Saskatchewan Future 40 Under 40, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), 2014
  • Platoon Leader, U.S.Army, 2001