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Individual Fable Cards

1920?  "Aide-toi, le ciel t'aidera."  Card showing two boys on a raft.  Librairie d'Education Natinale, Paris.  $6 from Bertrand Cocq, Nov., '20.

The verso presents a story of Louis and Paul.  One of them learns to raise his jacket as a signal to sailors of their need for help.  La Fontaine, of course, quotes this saying as the last line of his fable on Hercules and the wagon-driver.

1930? 1 FS colored card.  No publisher or artist indicated. 

This card presents a pleasing view of the two animals approaching two tall slim-necked vases.  The full text of La Fontaine's FS fable is on the verso.  Nothing else is on the verso. It turns out that this card's image is identical with the image -- though not the title font -- on the card in the series by Alcide Picard.

 1950?    Full-colored cartoon card of FC.  Lyon: Volumetrix.  No artist acknowledged.  $4 from Bertrand Cocq, Calonne-Ricouart, France, Sept., ’20.

A little research suggests that Volumetrix expanded to include a Paris location and that they produced many cards for collection.  The two different fable series found on the web seem to include titles on the illustration side of their cards.  There is no such title here.  It is hard to know whether this is a trade card or simply a “fable card.”  With no evidence that it was used to sell a product, I will include it with fable cards.  There is a stamped set of purpose letters at a 90 degree angle to the fable text on the verso. 

 

 

 1950?    Colored cartoon card of MM.  No editor or publisher acknowledged.  $5 from Bertrand Cocq, Calonne-Ricouart, France, Sept., ’20.

Here is an unusual representation of MM!  Perrette seems, as she steps on a banana peel, to be completely out of whack!  Even her tongue is sticking out of her mouth.  I have the impression of having seen this illustration somewhere else in the collection, but I cannot find it.  Here in any case is a very creative presentation of the fable!  The verso has the fable text and nothing else.