What is a Jesuit Education?

At Creighton, we're forming leaders for a more just world.

With a primary focus on giving you the best Jesuit education, we infuse Jesuit principles into both the curriculum and the student experience at Creighton. Finding God in all things is just one of the values on which St. Ignatius founded the Jesuit religious order more than 470 years ago. On campus, you’ll see members of the Jesuit community as your instructors, pastors, chaplains and university administration and staff.

Our Jesuit-inspired Ratio Studiorum academic advising program encourages students to be guided by principles of ethical living, service to others, the search for truth and a passion for justice.

Our students, faculty, staff and alumni are spiritually energized by Creighton’s role in the community and by the services provided by the Mission and Ministry division.

Additionally, Creighton students volunteer hundreds of thousands of hours of community service each year.  It’s what attending a Jesuit college is all about. 

Characteristics of a Jesuit Education

Jesuit Education Characteristics

Magis: Literally translated “more.” This is the challenge to strive for excellence.

Women & Men for and with Others: Sharing gifts, pursuing justice, and having concern for the poor and marginalized.

Cura Personalis: “Care for the individual person.” Respecting each person as a child of God and all of God’s creations.

Unity of Heart, Mind, & Soul: Developing the whole person. Integrating all aspects of our lives.

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (AMDG): “For the Greater Glory of God.”

Forming & Educating Agents of Change: Teaching behaviors that reflect critical thought and responsible action on moral and ethical issues.

Who was St. Ignatius?

St. Ignatius of Loyola was born in 1491 in the Basque country of northern Spain. He was devoted to chivalry and suffered a severe leg wound in battle. During an extended recovery period, he experienced a profound conversion, and devoted the rest of his life to serving God. Ignatius died in 1556 and was canonized a saint in 1622.

Ignatius left two great legacies. He founded the Society of Jesus in 1540, together with nine companions, and became their first Superior General with headquarters in Rome. He also wrote the Spiritual Exercises, a treatise on prayer. Its genius lies in the method of prayer it teaches, helping those who engage sincerely to follow Jesus and to seek God’s will in all circumstances. Today it is the basis for a growing apostolate of retreats and spiritual direction.